Postdoctoral opportunity in Superconducting Quantum Amplifiers

We are seeking an enthusiastic postdoctoral researcher for a new project to develop a microwave parametric amplifier based on quantum paraelectricity. Superconducting parametric amplifiers are exquisitely sensitive and can resolve signals at the smallest levels allowed by quantum mechanics. We are developing amplifiers that aim to work in a magnetic field, which existing technologies based…

Postdoctoral opportunities: Research Fellows in condensed-matter atomic clocks

We are seeking two postdoctoral researchers to create a condensed-matter miniature atomic clock. For more information, see https://hr-jobs.lancs.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=0556-22 We are seeking two Research Fellows to develop a condensed-matter atomic clock. They will join a new and ambitious effort, in collaboration between Lancaster University and LocatorX, Inc., to apply new developments in electron spin resonance to…

Postdoctoral opportunities: Senior Research Associate (x2) in superconducting qubits with moveable junctions

We are seeking two postdoctoral researchers to study quantum nanomechanics using superconducting qubits with moveable junctions. For more information, see https://hr-jobs.lancs.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=0460-22 Coupling between a mechanical resonator and a qubit is a key to controlling single phonons, to creating ultra-sensitive detectors for force and displacement, and ultimately to studying mesoscopic quantum superpositions of millions of nucleons.…

Outreach event: Particles, Polymers and Periodicity

On 10 May, you will have the opportunity to hear about our research at the Crafty Scholar pub, which is hosting Lancaster’s Pint of Science event. Edward will be speaking our search for dark matter using quantum amplifiers. For tickets, see https://pintofscience.co.uk/event/particles-polymers-and-periodicity-a-night-of-pick-n-mix-science

How a clock is like a steam engine

Our new work on the thermodynamic cost of timekeeping has been published in Physical Review X. Thermodynamics tells us that there are two fundamental types of machine than cannot operate without releasing heat. One is the mechanical engine, which releases heat to do work, and the other is the computer memory, which releases heat when…

New applications of radio-frequency reflectometry

Radio-frequency reflectometry is an important experimental technique that we use to make fast and sensitive measurements of quantum devices. Its applications keep multiplying. Here are two new ones: Led by Josh Chawner and the Jon Prance group, we have helped devise a new thermometer: Non-galvanic calibration and operation of a quantum dot thermometer by J.…

New project: Quantum Sensors for the Hidden Sector

We have just started an exciting project to use quantum electronics to search for dark matter. We will be developing sensitive amplifiers to detect the decay of axions – hypothetical particles that, if they exist, might simultaneously explain dark matter and solve the strong CP problem in particle physics. One PhD studentship is available on…

In Nature Communications: Machine learning for tuning quantum dots

Our paper Machine learning enables completely automatic tuning of a quantum device faster than human experts has been published today in Nature Communications. Semiconductors are among the most promising materials for making a quantum computer. However, semiconductor devices contain defects, which means that every qubit is slightly different. These differences must be cancelled by adjusting…