June 11, 2019

Team

 

Alex Metcalfe

Principal Investigator

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Alex Metcalfe holds degrees in Literae Humaniores (Oxford, 1990) and in Arabic (Leeds, 1996) where he also received his doctorate before becoming a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow (2001–4). He is currently Senior Lecturer in the Department of History at Lancaster University where he also held a British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship (2011–12). Before becoming Principal Investigator of this project, he was Co-I on the AHRC project ‘The Norman Edge: Identity and State Formation on the Frontiers of Europe (2008–11)’, as well as on an international project on Sardinia led by Istituto di storia dell’Europa mediterranea (ISEM-CNR) in Cagliari and The McDonald Institute, Cambridge (2012–15). He has been Visiting Professor and/or Research Fellow at the University of Cagliari; The Jagiellonian University in Krakow; ISEM-CNR in Cagliari; Wolfson College, Oxford; The Oriental Institute and Khalili Research Centre, Oxford, as well as the universities of Cyprus in Nicosia, Aarhus in Denmark, and Ca’ Fóscari in Venice.  Alex is best known for his work on Muslim–Christian relations in the medieval Mediterranean, especially in Sicily and south Italy. Alex lists among his hobbies and interests: cooking, eating, gardening, swimming, magic and illusions, and playing the guitar.

Luciano Gallinari

International Co-Investigator

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Luciano Gallinari is a researcher at the Istituto di Storia dell’Europa Mediterranea of the National Research Council (CNR). PhD in Medieval History (1998) and in Histoire et Civilisations at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris (2009). He is a professor of Diplomatics at the University of Sassari (1997-2000). Editor in chief of “RiMe. Rivista dell’Istituto di Storia dell’Europa Mediteranea” (http://rime.cnr.it). Luciano is also responsible for several international research projects including: “E pluribus unum. Il profilo identitario sardo dal Medioevo alla Contemporaneità”, funded by the Autonomous Region of Sardinia (2015-2018) in collaboration with the Universities of Cagliari, Lleida (Spain), Murcia (Spain) and Sassari, and the Istituto per le Tecnologie Didattiche of the CNR of Genoa and “Intercultural influence between East and West: 11th-21st centuries”, with the participation of ASRT (Academy for Scientific Research and Techonology, Egypt), CNR and the Universities of Damanhour and Alexandria (Egypt). He is author of numerous essays on the relations between the Crown of Aragon and Italy (XIII-XV centuries), on Byzantine and Giudicati Sardinia (ss.VI -XI).

Thomas Birch

International Co-Investigator

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Thomas Birch is an archaeologist who focuses on the study of material culture and technology. After receiving a degree in Archaeology and Anthropology (Cambridge, 2007), he completed a Masters in Technology and Analysis of Archaeological Materials (UCL, 2009). His doctoral thesis (Aberdeen, 2013) focused on the provenancing of iron for weapons and knives from southern Scandinavia during the Iron Age. As a postdoctoral fellow at Goethe Universität (Frankfurt) and then at UCL Qatar (Doha), Tom reconstructed silver networks by provenancing some of the earliest silver coinage from the Western Mediterranean (southern Italy and Sicily, 500–100 BCE) using isotopic and chemical techniques, and has also been reconstructing iron-smelting practices at the royal city of Meroe in the kingdom of Kush in Sudan (500 BCE–500 CE). Recently, he completed his Assistant Professorship at the Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet) in Aarhus (Denmark) where he has been collaborating on several projects ranging from Viking metals from the first town in Scandinavia, to copper alloys and coinage during the transition from Late Roman/Byzantine to early Islamic periods in the Near East. Apart from working on the Sardinia project, Tom is also working closely with Moesgaard Museum on various projects on Danish metal finds. Apart from investigating artefacts, Tom enjoys spending time with his family, travelling and discovering new places.

Hervin Fernández-Aceves

Postdoctoral Research Associate

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Hervin Fernández-Aceves is a medievalist and historian working on Mediterranean societies, Italian historiography and medieval charters. He received his Licentiate (5-year programme) in Political Sciences and Public Administration (UNAM, 2011). He then graduated from the Central European University, in Budapest, gaining a distinction in the double MA in History and Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies, and being awarded both the Pro-Rector’s Academic Excellence prize and the Zvetlana-Mihaela Tănasă Annual Excellence Award for his dissertation. He took up the post of University Research Scholar at the University of Leeds in 2013. At Leeds, he received a CONACYT (Mexico) Overseas scholarship, was awarded the annual extraordinary research prize, and served as the elected president of the Mexican Society of the University Union. He received his doctoral degree in Medieval History in 2018 (Leeds). Hervin began his postdoctoral research on Medieval Sardinia, first as Visiting Research Fellow at the Leeds Arts and Humanities Research Institute, and then as an Award-holder at the British School at Rome. His research interests lie in the intersection of relational sociology, Mediterranean history and medieval studies.

Marco Muresu

Postdoctoral Research Associate

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Marco Muresu graduated from the University of Cagliari in Beni Culturali (Cultural Heritage) in 2009 and in Archaeology in 2011. He subsequently received a Diploma di Specializzazione in Beni Archeologici in 2013, with a minor in Late Antique and Medieval Archaeology and a dissertation on Byzantine coin finds in Sardinia. This subject was also the topic of his doctoral thesus, which was defended in 2017, and funded by the Autonomous Region of Sardinia within the European Union Social Fund Programme. Marco has collaborated actively with the Chair of Christian and Medieval Archaeology of the University of Cagliari since 2012; is a member of the Editorial board of the scientific journal, ArcheoArte, and the section editor-in chief of the medieval section of the journal, Layers. Archeologia, territorio, contesti both of which are sponsored by the University of Cagliari. Marco primary scientific interests focus on the Byzantine Western Mediterranean, primarily Sardinia and Africa on which he is an expert in metal artefacts and coin, from Late Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages.

 

 

 

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