How to ensure you always see our Facebook posts

A few of our followers have reported that they don’t always see our Facebook posts very promptly (in fact, sometimes they may appear a day late!). So here’s how to ensure you never miss one of our Facebook posts. Go to the AuroraWatch UK Facebook page in a web browser (rather than through a Facebook…

Moving from Lancaster to Aberdeen

Following on from that missed event, we have been working on a few changes to our alert system to hopefully improve our alert level accuracy. Whilst some of those changes are still being worked on and tested, today we made the switch to using data from our Aberdeen (Crooktree) magnetometer, rather than our Lancaster magnetometer,…

AuroraWatch UK gets a camera!

At AuroraWatch UK we’ve always enjoyed looking at your photos of the aurora but, up until now, we’ve never captured any of our own. Today, however, we have some exciting news to share: AuroraWatch UK is getting its own aurora camera! Thanks to funding from Lancaster University’s Faculty of Science and Technology, the AWUK team…

Copyright David Baird and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Did I photograph the aurora or was it something else?

One of the most frequent questions we receive on Facebook is: is this a photo of the aurora? So in this blog post, we’re going to list a few questions that you should ask yourself to help determine if you’ve snapped a photo of the aurora. Q1: What does AuroraWatch UK say? Although not perfect,…

We got it wrong last night and here’s why

As followers of AuroraWatch UK will undoubtedly be aware, last night was a pretty good night for seeing the aurora from across the UK. As shown in Figure 1, enhanced solar wind speeds, reaching 600 km/s at their peak, were recorded and were the result of a coronal hole high speed stream (you may see…

Five key findings from 15 years of the International Space Station

Gareth Dorrian, Lancaster University The International Space Station is the longest-running continuously inhabited human outpost in space – this year it celebrated its 15th anniversary. As the ISS orbits the Earth it is essentially in a state of free fall, counteracting the Earth’s gravity and providing an ideal platform for science in space. Science aboard…

What’s it like to see auroras on other planets?

Nathan Case, Lancaster University Witnessing an aurora first-hand is a truly awe-inspiring experience. The natural beauty of the northern or southern lights captures the public imagination unlike any other aspect of space weather. But auroras aren’t unique to Earth and can be seen on several other planets in our solar system. An aurora is the…