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The 3rd Workshop on Arabic Corpus Linguistics (WACL-3)

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The 3rd Workshop on Arabic Corpus Linguistics (WACL-3)

To be held at the Corpus Linguistics 2019 Conference, Cardiff, United Kingdom, on 22 July 2019.

Venue: : Room 1.25, 1st floor, Main Building, Park Place, CF10 3AT [MAP]

 

NEW: Workshop program is now out WACL3_Program

NEW: Workshop proceedings are now on ACL Anthology:  WACL3 Proceedings

 

WACL-3 Broadcast (PART 1):

WACL-3 Broadcast (PART 2):

 

NEW: Notifications of acceptance are now out.

NEW: Registration is now open on the Conference Main page

Submit Paper Contact Us

 

Important Dates:

Feb 18, 2019: First Call for Workshop Papers

April 8, 2019: Second Call for Workshop Papers

May 14, 2019: Final Call for Workshop Papers

May 28, 2019 (anywhere in the world or 29/5/2019 1pm UK time): Workshop Papers Due Date [extended]

Jun 14, 2019: Notification of Acceptance (notifications sent)

Jun 26, 2019 (anywhere in the world or 27/06/2019 1pm UK time): Camera Ready Papers due date

Jul 08, 2019 Workshop Schedule

Monday July 22, 2019: Workshop Date (Full day 9am to 5pm).

 

Workshop Description:

Over recent years, research into the Arabic language using corpora and corpus methods has moved from a small scale activity with isolated pockets of activity to a much larger very active field, with work advancing rapidly on many different fronts in both corpus and computational linguistics. Previously, we organised the 2011 and 2013 Workshops on Arabic Corpus Linguistics WACL-1 and WACL-2, with the second edition being held in conjunction with 2013 Corpus Linguistics Conference at Lancaster University. We now continue working on creating a venue where different activities in corpus research into Arabic can be brought together to explore progress in the field by continuing the WACL series through organising the 3rd Workshop on Arabic Corpus Linguistics (WACL-3) at the CL2019 conference at Cardiff University.

The scope of the workshop encompasses both (a) the design, construction and annotation of Arabic corpora, and (b) the use of corpora in research on the Arabic language – in areas including lexis and lexicography, syntax, collocation, stylistics, and discourse analysis, and Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems and analysis tools. The workshop will pay special attention to non-standard Arabic varieties, Arabic dialects as well as Modern Standard Arabic (MSA).

The workshop is planned as a full day event including a keynote talk, oral and poster presentations.

 

Call for papers:

We invite full papers submissions for the full-day Third Workshop on Arabic Corpus Linguistics, to be held in conjunction with the Corpus Linguistics 2019 conference in Cardiff, Wales. Following on from the successful First and Second WACL in 2011, and 2013.

The aim of this series of workshops is to create a venue for exploring progress in the field of research into the Arabic language variations using corpora, from across the many areas of corpus linguistics and computational linguistics where the analysis of Arabic structure and usage is an active issue.

The scope of the workshop encompasses both (a) the design, construction and annotation of Arabic corpora, and (b) the use of corpora in research on the Arabic language – in any relevant area, including (but not limited to!) lexis and lexicography, syntax, collocation, NLP systems and analysis tools, contrastive and historical studies, stylistics, and discourse analysis. All varieties of Arabic – including the different Colloquial and Dialectical Arabic as well as Classical/Qur’anic and Modern Standard forms of the language – are within the workshop’s purview.

Papers for presentations are invited on any of these areas, or on any other topic related to the study of Arabic-language corpora. Presentations either describing finished research or reporting work in progress are welcome. Submissions from postgraduate students are especially welcome. Dual submissions should be disclosed at time of submission.

 

Submissions Guidelines:

submissions must describe substantial, original, completed and unpublished work. Wherever appropriate, concrete evaluation and analysis should be included. 

Submissions may consist of no less than four (4) and up to eight (8) pages of content, plus unlimited references.

Submission Template: 

We follow ACL 2019 submission template as below:

Accepted papers authors are required to submit a camera ready to be included in the final proceedings. Authors of accepted papers will be notified after the notification of acceptance with further details.

Accepted papers will be published in a proceedings hosted at ACL Anthology https://aclanthology.info.

The Proceedings will include both oral and poster papers, in the same format.

Authors of papers accepted for oral or poster presentation at WACL3 must notify the program chairs by the camera-ready deadline as to whether the paper will be presented. We will not accept for publication or presentation the papers that overlap significantly in content or results with papers that will be (or have been) published elsewhere.

 

Submissions Link:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=wacl3

 

Duration of the workshop:

The workshop is planned as a full-day event including a keynote talk on 22 July 2019.

 

Final Schedule:

Monday, July 22, 2019

09:15–09:20 Opening Remarks
Dr Mahmoud El-Haj
Lancaster University, UK

09:20–10:05 Keynote Speaker

“A linguistic representation of script for the Arabic Corpus: from Unicode to manuscripts”
Dr Alicia González Martínez
University of Hamburg, Germany

10:05–12:30 Session 1:

10:05–10:30 Writing Styles of Salwa and Al-Qarni
Ahmed Omer and Michael Oakes

10:30–10:55 Classifying Information Sources in Arabic Twitter to Support Online Monitoring of Infectious Diseases
Lama Alsudias and Paul Rayson

10:55–11:15 Coffee Break [VJ gallery and marquee]

11:15–11:40 Verbs in Egyptian Arabic: a case for register variation
Michael Grant White and Deryle W. Lonsdale

11:40–12:05 The Design of the SauLTC application for the English-Arabic Learner Translation Corpus
Maha Al-Harthi and Amal Alsaif

12:05–12:30 Computer Stylometric Comparison of Writings by Qassim Amin and Mohammed Abdu on Women’s Rights
Ahmed Omer and Michael Oakes

12:30-13:30 Lunch break (marquee)

13:30–16:20 Session 2:

13:30–13:55 Text Segmentation Using N-grams to Annotate Hadith Corpus
Shatha Altammami, Eric Atwell and Ammar Alsalka

13:55–14:20 Classifying Arabic dialect text in the Social Media Arabic Dialect Corpus (SMADC)
Areej Alshutayri and Eric Atwell

14:20–14:45 Compiling and Analysing a Corpus of Transcribed Spoken Gulf Pidgin Arabic Based on Length of Stay in the Gulf
Najah Albaqawi and Michael Oakes

14:45–15:10 Crisis Detection from Arabic Tweets
Alaa Alharbi and Mark Lee

15:10–15:30 Coffee Break [VJ gallery and marquee]

15:30–15:55 Distance-Based Authorship Verification Across Modern Standard Arabic Genres
Hossam Ahmed

15:55–16:20 Can Modern Standard Arabic tools be used for Arabic Dialects? Sentiment Analysis as a Case Study
Chatrine Qwaider, Stergios Chatzikyriakidis and Simon Dobnik

 

16:20–16:25 Closing Remarks
Dr Mahmoud El-Haj
Lancaster University, UK

16:50–17:00 CL Conference: Welcome (large chemistry): Professor Gillian Bristow, Dean of Research for the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Cardiff University

17:00–18:00 CL Conference: Plenary (Sir Martin Evans Lecture Theatre): Svenja Adolphs – Corpus Linguistics in the Digital Humanities (introduced by Dawn Knight)

18:10–20:00 CL Conference: Drinks reception (marquee) [kindly sponsored by Cambridge University Press]

 

Workshop location:

Venue: : Room 1.25, 1st floor, Main Building, Park Place, CF10 3AT [MAP]

 

Contact Person:

Dr Mahmoud El-Haj

wacl3@easychair.org

 

Organising Committee:

 

Programme Committee:

  • Ahmed Ali, Qatar Computing Research Institute (QCRI), Qatar.
  • Ahmed Abdelali, Qatar Computing Research Institute (QCRI), Qatar.
  • Almoataz B. Al-Said, Cairo University, Egypt.
  • Eric Atwell, Leeds University, UK.
  • Haithem Afli, Dublin City University, Ireland.
  • Hazem Hajj, American University of Beirut, Lebanon.
  • Ignatius Ezeani, Lancaster University, UK.
  • Imed Zitouni, Microsoft Research, USA.
  • Karim Bouzoubaa, Mohamed Vth University, Morocco.
  • Khaled Shaban, Qatar University, Qatar.
  • Lama Alsudias, Lancaster University, UK.
  • Mahmoud El-Haj, Lancaster University, UK.
  • Mariam Aboelezz, Birkbeck, University of London, UK.
  • Nadi Tomeh, University of Paris 13, France.
  • Nizar Habash, New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE.
  • Nora Al-Twairesh, King Saudi University, Saudi Arabia.
  • Paul Rayson, Lancaster University, UK.
  • Scott Piao, Lancaster University, UK.
  • Taha Zerrouki, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Informatique, Algeria.
  • Tamer Elsayed, Qatar University, Qatar.
  • Violetta Cavalli-Sforza, Al Akhawayn University, Morocco.
  • Wajdi Zaghouani, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar.
  • Wassim El-Hajj, American University of Beirut, Lebanon.

 

List of Accepted Papers:

Ahmed Omer and Michael Oakes Writing Styles of Salwa and Al-Qarni
Shatha Altammami, Eric Atwell and Ammar Alsalka Text Segmentation Using N-grams to Annotate Hadith Corpus
Alaa Alharbi and Mark Lee Crisis Detection from Arabic Tweets
Areej Alshutayri and Eric Atwell Classifying Arabic dialect text in the Social Media Arabic Dialect Corpus (SMADC)
Najah Albaqawi and Michael Oakes Compiling and Analysing a Corpus of Transcribed Spoken Gulf Pidgin Arabic Based on Length of Stay in the Gulf
Michael Grant White and Deryle W. Lonsdale Verbs in Egyptian Arabic: a case for register variation
Hossam Ahmed Distance-Based Authorship Verification Across Modern Standard Arabic Genres
Maha Al-Harthi and Amal Alsaif The Design of the SauLTC application for the English-Arabic Learner Translation Corpus
Chatrine Qwaider, Stergios Chatzikyriakidis and Simon Dobnik Can Modern Standard Arabic tools be used for Arabic Dialects? Sentiment Analysis as a Case Study
Ahmed Omer and Michael Oakes Computer Stylometric Comparison of Writings by Qassim Amin and Mohammed Abdu on Women’s Rights
Lama Alsudias and Paul Rayson Classifying Information Sources in Arabic Twitter to Support Online Monitoring of Infectious Diseases

 

 

 

Previous Workshops:

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