Blog

Marthe Cuvelier, ‘Mapping William Wilson by Edgar Allan Poe’

Marthe Cuvelier is a student at the University of Antwerp (Belgium), and is currently completing a semester abroad at Lancaster. After having obtained her bachelor’s degree in Linguistics and Literature, option English – Theatre, Film and Literature, she now continues her studies by doing a master’s degree in English Linguistics and Literature. For this mapping assignment I chose a short story called William Wilson, written by Edgar Allan Poe. It was published in 1839 and tells us a part of the life story of a man called William Wilson. We follow William Wilson from his primary school to his later …

Continue Reading

Autumn Barlow, ‘Three Men in a Boat, on a Map’

Autumn Barlow is completing an MA in English Literature at Lancaster University. Jerome K Jerome’s short story Three Men in A Boat was published in 1889. It was originally intended to be a travel guide, but it soon became a humorous account of three men trying to have a boating holiday up the Thames. As my maps reveal, though, it’s much more than that. What could have been a straightforward line meandering up a river and back again is exploded across the world, and ultimately this book demonstrates the global consciousness of the average late Victorian reader – as well …

Continue Reading

Locating Pride and Prejudice

By Emily Butt (MA Student, Lancaster University) This semester, the new English Literature MA module Nineteenth Century Literature: Place – Space – Text asked students to complete a digital map for their formative assessment. Their brief was to select a nineteenth-century text and to use a digital mapping tool such as Google MyMaps or CartoDB to create a map of an element of their chosen text. That map should raise questions about the ways that we conceive of or understand place/space in the text. For more information about this task, please get in touch with the module tutor, Joanna Taylor. Here, Emily calculates …

Continue Reading

Beholding Shelley’s Euganean Hills

By Rebekah Musk (MA student, Lancaster University) This semester, the new English Literature MA module Nineteenth Century Literature: Place – Space – Text asked students to complete a digital map for their formative assessment. Their brief was to select a nineteenth-century text and to use a digital mapping tool such as Google MyMaps or CartoDB to create a map of an element of their chosen text. That map should raise questions about the ways that we conceive of or understand place/space in the text. For more information about this task, please get in touch with the module tutor, Joanna Taylor. Here, Rebekah suggests …

Continue Reading

Mapping Pride and Prejudice

By Lex Elliott (MA Student, Lancaster University) This semester, the new English Literature MA module Nineteenth Century Literature: Place – Space – Text asked students to complete a digital map for their formative assessment. Their brief was to select a nineteenth-century text and to use a digital mapping tool such as Google MyMaps or CartoDB to create a map of an element of their chosen text. That map should raise questions about the ways that we conceive of or understand place/space in the text. For more information about this task, please get in touch with the module tutor, Joanna Taylor. Here, Lex …

Continue Reading

Prospects for using the digital humanities in demographic history

On Monday 28 November 2016 the Spatial Humanities project held a meeting of invited experts from around the world to consider together how digital approaches, such as the ones developed during the project, might contribute to future research in demographic history. The focus of the day was to look at current research challenges in these fields, and ask where the tools of digital humanities could be of most use. The goal is to help clarify a future research agenda in which the digital humanities move from the demonstration of tools and techniques to the delivery of new knowledge discovery. A …

Continue Reading

Corpus Linguistics, and why you might want to use it, despite what (you think) you know about it

Amelia Joulain-Jay, a PhD candidate in History at Lancaster, has written this blog post for the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals. Her work investigates the potential of corpus linguistics to allow for the exploration of spatial patterns in large amounts of digitised historical texts. Amelia was awarded the 2016 Gale Dissertation Research Fellowship in Nineteenth-Century Media for this work. She will be delighted to answer (to the best of her abilities) any queries you may have about using corpus linguistics for your research on c19th newspapers. You can contact her on Twitter via @joulain_jay or email her at a.t.joulain@lancaster.ac.uk.

Continue Reading

Reading and mapping Swallows and Amazons

On July 24 this year, the new film adaptation of Arthur Ransome’s children’s classic Swallows and Amazons (first published in 1930, and set in summer 1929) had its world premiere at the Theatre by the Lake in Keswick, one of the more frequently-visited towns in the Lake District National Park. The film, like the book on which it’s based, tells the story of the four Walker children – John, Susan, Titty (renamed Tatty in the film) and Roger – and their adventures on and around a Cumbrian lake. The film’s director, Philippa Lowthorpe, was drawn to the project because Ransome’s …

Continue Reading