4 key tips when starting University

Starting university is certainly a very exciting time for a whole load of different reasons. Moving away from home, meeting new people, and studying something you enjoy are just some of the reasons why so many simply cannot wait to pack their bags, and commence what people often regard as the best years of their life. There is no doubting that university is a brilliant experience, but this is not to say it doesn’t come with its challenges. Here are 5 things to keep in mind right from the off at Lancaster University.

  1. Go to Fresher’s Fair

Often missed by many due to other Fresher’s Week traditions, the Fresher’s Fair is an absolute must during your first week at university. The event provides a great opportunity for you to find out about the abundance of things that Lancaster University offers. In particular, it will give you the chance to meet over 200 different clubs and societies. From Baking to Belly Dancing, you really are spoilt for choice and are bound to find something for you. Even if you have no interest of joining any societies, just go along for the freebies, and you may even pick up a pasty or two.

  1. Take a good look round

Lancaster University’s campus may not be the biggest, but you wouldn’t say it’s small either, and getting to know your way round will probably take you a bit of time. However, Fresher’s Week will give you a good opportunity to take a walk around the campus and learn where everything is located a bit better. I recommend you put aside some time in your first week to do this since campus is usually relatively quiet in this period, and before you know it, you will find yourself having to navigate to your first lecture in a busy environment. Make sure you pay a visit to where your academic subject is located and know where you can get your groceries. Also, look out for campus tours running during Fresher’s Week. These will save you from using a map to navigate around the university.

  1. Stay on top of your work

I understand there is a strong temptation when starting university to ease yourself in and start off slow. After all, you’ve just arrived, and you want to have a bit of fun, right? I would recommend easing yourself in as you will be in a new environment and things will be different. But make sure you don’t fall into the trap of not doing any work for the first month. I don’t want to speak like I am your parents here, but it is important you go to your lectures, and do the work which is required of you. Lancaster University is not a top ten institution for nothing, students are expected to work hard. Of course, a lot of university is about enjoying yourself and having a good time but remember to not forget the main reason you have come to university!

  1. Don’t leave coursework until the last minute

And here we are, the piece of advice we’ve all heard so many times before. Whoever tells us though, and despite how many times they do, students have an inherent tendency to not start their coursework until the night before and submit the all-important piece of work thirty seconds before the deadline. There are a couple of reasons why I’d opt against this. Firstly, there is a strong chance that your first piece of coursework will involve you having to do some kind of referencing. Now, unless I am the only exception, it takes students some time to get their head around the different components of referencing, and what format the University expects. This in itself is a reason to start your coursework early, as the last thing you want is having to figure out how to reference at 4am, as the deadline quickly approaches. The second reason is that depending on your degree, you are likely to have a few different pieces to submit at around the same time. Leaving them all to the last few days could just be too much to handle.

Guest blogger Alexandra Ursu: The world is in Millennials’ hands

I am a 20-year-old Millennial who wants to change the world. Despite all the critics and the bad press we receive, our voices matter – and I can prove it. Individuals, who are part of a movement, striving for change for a more sustainable world, surround me. What is making me so positive about our impact on the future of Planet Earth? Towards the end of last year, along with a team of nine other students, I attended the World Business Council for Sustainable Development meeting in Mexico City, a revealing experience that has demonstrated that forward-thinkers recognize our importance in driving change.

Why are people so reticent when it comes to our generation? Some may say it is because of our narcissistic behavior, placing us in the centre of our own universe, without considering the impact of our actions on others. According to a recent research conducted by Red Brick, 80% of hiring managers claim that their Millennial employees display narcissistic tendencies. Other people may say our lives are driven by technology, spending most of our time with our eyes stuck to devices with aspirations revolving around the number of likes we get or followers we have. I must be honest and admit that, for the majority of us, being popular on social media boosts our confidence. But is anybody thinking about the motives behind this seemingly superficial behaviour? Millennials are constantly facing criticism without being allowed to show our true colours. Therefore, online validation is the last resort we have – our last hope to be noticed and appreciated. You may consider it a scream for attention!

I strongly believe that, while making such bold statements, older generations forget one essential detail: their own children or grandchildren represent Millennials. Therefore, part of our behaviour has been directly influenced and shaped by them and the family environment we grew up in. Some parents are trying to get to grips with Millennial behaviour to show support to their children. It is no secret that even older generations now use all sorts of social platforms as a daily routine – so how fair is it to accuse the Millennials of something that the majority of individuals do? Did you know that, according to CNN Exit Polls, 55% of Millennials voted for Hilary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election? Most would be quick to blame the Millenials…

The conflict between generations has escalated quickly in the past few years. But the gap between generations has its roots well anchored in the past. “Children now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority, disrespect their elders and love talking instead of exercise”. It may sound like a perfect description of a Millennial in the eyes of a sceptic, but it is in fact Socrates’ view dating back to the 4th Century AD.

 ‘Millennials are often portrayed as apathetic, disinterested, tuned out and selfish. None of those adjectives describe the Millennials I’ve been privileged to meet and work with’ – quite a powerful quote from Chelsea Clinton, but would you agree? I want to prove her right using the power of example.

Last year, I was invited to apply to take part in a fieldtrip module that gave the students the opportunity to work as session hosts at the World Business Council for Sustainable Development’s (WBCSD) meeting in Mexico City. WBCSD is a not-for-profit CEO-led organisation, uniting over 200 world-leading businesses to try to accelerate us all to a more sustainable world. This year’s meeting was concentrated on showcasing good examples of business practices to help us get closer to realizing the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. The meeting brought together some of the most important companies in the world, offering them the perfect environment to collaborate and share ideas in order to find the most efficient solutions to the key issues they incur in their effort of delivering more sustainable business practices.

What drove me to apply for this unique opportunity? The desire of bringing actual change to the world we all live in, the need to make my voice heard, a passion for demonstrating that, despite the negative image that has artificially been created of the Millennials, my generation is still willing to play an active role in driving change for the future of humanity. With hopes and dreams, I submitted my application and, one month later, I was informed that I was one of the 10 students from Lancaster selected for the role. The competition was tough, with over 400 students invited to apply. Each one of the selected students is the living proof that the Millennials are not just a group of people thinking about money and luxury, but want to learn how they can drive change into the world.

I worked with passionate individuals and most importantly, as a team; we have demonstrated that there is still something good to say about our generation. How can we be called selfish when we are dedicating our time into helping those in need? For example, I have always been interested in sustainability and as Chief Information Officer for UNICEF Lancaster University; I had the chance to see the passion in the eyes of 2,000 University students who were giving up their free time to organize different fund-raising events for children in need. There is no other motivation for those volunteers apart from the desire to give something back to Society, playing a role in offering a chance to feed or educate those who are not as fortunate as them. Our latest event, Fast24, is a manifesto against hunger, and 20 volunteers will be living without food for 24 hours in order to raise awareness of the situation of millions of people in low developed areas of the world, empathizing with them and encouraging others to donate so that the money will be used to feed children in those areas. And I am not the only member of our Student Ambassadors Team concerned about the wellbeing of others. Other colleagues have sacrificed their summer in order to volunteer to teach English to African children. Therefore, the first thing that my WBCSD experience has reinforced is that the Millennials do have souls and that we are capable of making a difference. This has been proved by the interest the attendants had in hearing what we, the students, were thinking about some of the most pressing environmental problems to date, offering us the opportunity to play an active role in the debates and workshops delivered.

The other thing that I have learned is that our opinion does really matter for those who are willing to listen. During the days spent at the WBCSD Council Meeting in Mexico City, our team was involved in the majority of sessions and workshops delivered by dignitaries and World Business Leaders. I cannot find words to describe how revealing and inspirational the overall WBCSD Council Meeting experience was for us. There is no better environment for a Millennial to realize their importance on the face of Earth, as delegates recognized our power in changing the course of Mother Earth for the better. Their openness to our ideas, their willingness to hear our opinion on the issues discussed, the incredible support for our work and the overwhelming encouragement they expressed for us in order to spread our wings and to change the world for the better are my dose of inspiration for a lifetime.

Therefore, the WBCSD experience showed 10 Millennials feeling Society’s pressure and blame on their shoulders that this generation is still powerful for all the right reasons. Under the guidance and support of older generations, with a new vibe and innovatory visions, the Millennials can change something. We grew up in a world dominated by pollution and waste, which means that we are aware of the problems our planet is facing in terms of sustainability. With dedication and hard work, we are willing to find solutions, we are willing to fight for a cleaner world, we are willing to inspire, and we are willing to fight for good.

 

Is Being Catered Worth It? Or Am I Just Lazy?

I hope your week has been as exciting as mine! Although it feels as if we, freshers, have been thrown into a whirlwind of work, at the end of the day, it’s comforting to know that you can head back to your flat, relax and share a laugh with your flatmates. Or, for those who consistently apply their studies to every aspect of their life, argue about whether some corporations’ treatment of workers is justifiable, or if catered accommodation is a sunk cost… (Maybe? Maybe not? I wish I knew).

Speaking of catered accommodation, it’s awesome! No one can cook as well as my mother (shout out to the best mother!!), however being catered gives you the liberty to forget about planning meals, shopping for groceries, and if you’re like me, avoid sulking over the fact that the only food you can cook (properly) are eggs and pasta. Nevertheless, if you’re a true “Masterchef” or simply feeling adventurous, living in non-catered accommodation will improve your culinary skills while consolidating your time-management and organisational skills and prepare you to be a versatile, adept human being (which is why we’re at university- am I right?).

Which brings me to my next point about being a student, which is having the ability to choose. I know that sounds rather simple and obvious, but university makes you conscious of this power to decide for yourself and take control of most, if not all, aspects of your life. It may seem like a daunting task, but with the support of your friends and the University it isn’t difficult at all. And of course, this capability or power can only be of good use if you take every opportunity available that will help you grow and enrich your life immensely. And Lancaster University offers you plenty of such opportunities. From fostering your passions within your academic field to helping you venture into new areas and develop skills from there. Remember, university is the ideal place for growth, so don’t hesitate to keep learning; because one day, after all your enriching experiences, you’ll realize how far you’ve come and feel like you’re flying high above the clouds -equipped with the wings of knowledge and experiences that will carry you throughout the rest of your life.

And during this journey, you’ll never be alone. I am very grateful for the people I’ve met here-especially my wonderful friends (I might change my mind after I spend a year living with them, but hopefully not. Just kidding, friends). But don’t worry. Even if you don’t find the right friends in the first few weeks, there will come a time when you come across someone who is just as into music, film or chocolate cake as you are (feel free to send me a message and we can talk about the sublimity of chocolate!!) and then feel more connected to the wonderful community in the University. If you ask for my opinion, I would say that I couldn’t ask for more.

4 Reasons Why You Should Definitely Get a Part-Time Job

Attending university in the UK is expensive, there’s no getting around it. With tuition fees currently at £9250 a year (and that’s for UK students – international students can often find themselves paying more) and costs of living on the rise, it is no wonder that more students find themselves taking on part-time work alongside their studies. In fact, in a survey conducted by Endsleigh (2015), it was estimated that eight out of ten – around 77% of students – are currently working part-time to help fund their studies.

I am one of these students. I currently work most evenings for the university Alumni Office, which amounts to between 10 and 12 hours a week, and I am a strong advocate for being employed during your degree. Here’s why:

  1. It’s another opportunity to make new friends – University is all about meeting new people and having a part-time job is another way to make friends. Most people I work with are also students but they all have very different backgrounds and I would probably have never met them had it not been for this job.
  2. Financial independence – This one goes without saying. Knowing that you have money coming into your bank account at the end of the month is a great feeling, especially when you know that you worked hard to earn it.
  3. Gaining transferable skills for your CV – Even though the part-time job you get is unlikely to be directly related to your dream career, the skills you gain on the job will be very useful when you start applying for internships/jobs after graduating. Fundraising probably won’t be my long-term career path, but the skills I have gained from this job, such as negotiation and the ability to meet targets, are highly valued in whichever career I chose to pursue.
  4. Having less time actually forces you to get more done – This is a bit of a weird one but hear me out: because I know that 12 hours of my week will be spent at work and another 11 hours spent in lectures and seminars I have to manage my time very effectively, especially if I want to get in a good 7-8 hours sleep a night and spend some time with my friends. Ironically, the less I have to do, the less I get done.

Lancaster University is great for helping you find a part-time job, with regular updates about job opportunities on the iLancaster app and a great Careers Service that will help you with your application, either by having a look at your CV or doing mock interviews or sorting out any problems you might have with P45 forms (which are the opposite of fun).

Note: It is worth mentioning that international students may have some restrictions on the number of hours they are allowed to work, as per the terms of their visa. Make sure you double check this before applying to jobs. Also some degree courses (Medicine, Postgraduate etc.) are particularly intense, so it is also a good idea to consult your course adviser about whether you could feasibly commit to a part-time job during your studies.

Adjusting to degree-level study

As both a mature student and somebody who’d never studied business before, I was naturally more than just slightly apprehensive about starting a Marketing degree at a university as prestigious and well regarded as Lancaster.  What if I failed to understand any of the lecture content? What if I found the work too challenging? What if everyone else was 1000 times more knowledgeable than me?

I’m relieved to say – up to now at least! – that my fears have gone completely unfounded. Although the Marketing course is indeed challenging, it’s challenging in a good way. I’m really enjoying the fact that it gives me the opportunity to think critically and broaden my horizons.

Right from the very first assignment, we’re encouraged to challenge the formulaic approach to Marketing that is often presented at A Level – or in my case, in traditional Marketing textbooks. Instead, we’re encouraged to see Marketing as a continually evolving process, where creativity, flexibility and innovation are key. In my view, this is something that is becoming increasingly important in today’s corporate environment, where both consumer tastes and technology are changing rapidly.

As well as questioning traditional schools of thought, the degree is also allowing me to challenge my own beliefs. As part of a recent topic on marketing regulation, in our seminars, we’ve been preparing for a debate around the introduction of the sugar tax.

Now, as someone who identifies very much on the left side of the political spectrum, I’d expected to be very much in favour of the sugar tax – after all, anything that encourages people to live healthily can only be a good thing, right? However, after my group were assigned the role of Coca Cola in the debate, I’ve found my views continuously evolving. I’ve been able to appreciate not only the idea of consumer choice and the efforts made by corporations to increase the variety of sugar-free options available, but also to see the limitations of the policy in regards to consumer education.

The interactive nature of the Marketing seminars is something that I’m really enjoying too. Although the idea of sharing your thoughts with the group can be a daunting prospect at first, I’m finding that listening to the ideas of other students is really helping to consolidate my learning. Taking part in group projects – such as the Coca Cola debate – not only helps us to develop skills relevant to the workplace, but also allows us to get to better get to know our coursemates.   Sometimes, seminars can even be, dare I say it, fun!

I’m really looking forward to finding out what the next term has in store – and seeing which of my pre-conceived ideas will be challenged next!

Free MASH for all!

The best thing about being a student here at Lancaster University Management School is the free mash, without a doubt. Perhaps even better is that it is exclusive to LUMS students, meaning that your flatmates studying English or Politics cannot diminish the chunk of mash available to us Management School students.

Now, those of you reading this who are not currently studying at Lancaster University (this will be most of you), must be finding this quite complexing. “I can’t remember them telling us about free mash potato at that last applicant visit day, mum?”. And no, unfortunately this information won’t have been shared the last time you attended an event for prospective students. For the most part because LUMS of course do not offer free mash. Sorry guys.

Well, strictly speaking, they do! ‘MASH’ stands for ‘Maths and Stats help’, and it is a service designed to improve Management School students’ numerical skills. The likelihood is that if you come and study any LUMS degree, it will have some mathematical component. Since we’re not all the future John Nash, or that Maths teacher in high school who thought they could number crunch anything, we all may need a little help, from time to time.

The staff at LUMS understand this too, which is why you can book free one-to-one sessions with people who want to help you improve where possible, and help you achieve the best possible degree outcome. It doesn’t end there either, there are so many different services which LUMS students can utilise at their will, ranging from careers support to improving your writing skills.

Personally speaking, I did not have a particularly strong mathematical background before coming to university, but used all the help I had available to greatly improve my Maths skills during my first year. I know a lot of people who are sceptical about applying for certain Management School degrees as they do not believe they will be able to cope with the inherent mathematical components of certain subjects. If you are one of these, then I would encourage you not to be put off from studying a degree which you feel you will really enjoy, only because you don’t think you will be able to do the Maths.

I hope by reading this short piece, you now know a bit more about the variety of support available to LUMS students, and my positive experiences with them thus far. I hope that this blog also reflects how greatly your success at university is down to you. The help is there, you just need to adopt the mindset that you will look for it, you will find it, and you will use it.

Women in Economics

I still remember my first A Level Economics lesson: I was the only girl in a class of fifteen boys. Obviously, the problem here wasn’t that the economics faculty in my school didn’t accept girls onto their course (I mean, they let me in) but the problem was that girls weren’t applying to study this subject.

I can think of a few other examples of where certain subject areas seem to attract more men/discourage women from applying such as perhaps computing or engineering and it honestly baffles me. In a world where issues of gender equality and feminism are so current and openly discussed we still have girls being put off applying for traditionally “male-dominated” subjects.

Last term, the Lancaster Economics Society, together with LUMS, organised a talk by Manika Premsingh – an entrepreneur and economist. It was fascinating to hear about her journey to where she is today; and about the obstacles of being a woman in a “man’s world”. It really made me reflect on my own experiences of being a woman in economics and realise how important gender discussions are to the profession as a whole.

I am currently studying an Economics and International Relations degree and I can definitely say that the ratio of males to females in this subject has improved at university level, but it still isn’t where it should be. If we look at the below graph, taken from the Royal Economic Society website, we can clearly see how the number of male full-time undergraduate economics students has consistently been almost two times higher than the number of female students and I refuse to believe that this has anything to do with girls being less able or talented when it comes to this discipline.

 

 

Some of you may ask – well why does this matter? Maybe girls just want to do other things? Gender stereotyping aside, this view is very problematic simply because if research is only done by men, then the results are likely to fail at least half of the population – there are things that simply won’t be on male agendas. We need women to bring that perspective to the table.

Perhaps the issue is with our perception of economists. As the Financial Times so quaintly puts it: “To most people, an economist is the chap interviewed in newspapers or on the television uttering acronym-laced incantations about 0.3 per cent this or 10 per cent that. He is usually a man, rarely stylish, mysteriously confident, and a bit dull.” It’s hard to conjure up an image of a female role model in economics but that just means we need to become our own role models. I, for one, would love to see more women on the cover of the Economist and the Financial Times.

Guest post: An investment banking spring week at Barclays

Theodoros Georgiadis, a first year student on the Accounting and Finance programme at LUMS, gives an interesting insight into his experiences during his spring week placement at Barclays.

I applied for my Spring Week in the middle of my first term at LUMS and I am so glad I did as the experience gave me a huge insight into the world of banking and it positions me very well for next year. My week ran as follows:

Day 1:  We had a welcome session from senior people working in Barclays and started to gain our first insight into the financial markets. We were advised there would be lots of group work and, indeed, present a group project on our final day. Additionally, it was clear there would be lots of networking sessions with the opportunity to meet current employees across all sectors of Barclays and other Spring Interns from other departments with the prospect of making lots of new connections.

Day 2: I met my Barclays ‘buddy’ and would work shadow him throughout the week. As well as seeing his work, it was an opportunity to gain a personal opinion from someone currently working in the bank about ‘life at Barclays’. I also received an introduction and overview into the Barclaycard (credit card) division of Barclays. Indeed, most days, in my group, I received an introduction and overview on a different department.

Day 3: I was introduced to Barclays Wealth and Business Banking and had group project work to complete. Throughout the week there was a big emphasis on Barclays’ values which follow the acronym RISES: Respect, Integrity, Service, Excellence, Stewardship. Clearly the Bank wants employees who can truly embrace and fit into the Barclays culture.

Day 4: An insight into Corporate Banking and Consumer Banking and further group project work.

Day 5: I had the opportunity to get involved in some filming in a digital studio all targeting  next year’s candidates applying for the Barclays Spring Week programme. I never imagined that media and marketing played such a big part within Investment Banking; I thought it was all about finance!

Importantly, also on the final day, I had an interview, CV guidance and a discussion about which division I wished to apply to for a summer internship next year. Depending on what you want to do, if your interviews go well soon after the Spring Week, a candidate can be offered a 2nd year summer internship even though he/she is still in their first year at LUMS! Indeed, I now have an interview next week for a 2nd year summer internship in Barclays Wealth Management. If I secure this position, this is the dream scenario to be in and one of the big attractions of Spring Weeks.

Finally, we presented our group project to senior employees of the bank – a nerve wracking but thrilling experience. We had been tasked to come up with a new initiative so that Barclays can attract more 18-24 year olds. We focused on the student market with a ‘Barclays Scholar Account’ concept.

Reflecting on the week, I was able to gather a lot of information on the different business divisions and associated career paths at Barclays; everything from Investment Banking, Wealth Management, Business Banking, Corporate Banking, Consumer Banking, Technology and Operations. There was the opportunity to meet new people, both from inside and outside of Barclays, as well as the opportunity to develop new skills particularly via the group tasks. Of course, I also have the 2nd year internship interview next week. The whole experience was hugely rewarding.

Guest post: My job application journey so far

Final year LUMS Accounting and Finance student Prithiv Ghosal shares his experiences of the financial services application processes and his journey so far as an international student. He also offers some excellent advice to those seeking employment in this sector.

Hi, I am a final year international student in Accounting and Finance at LUMS. I have previously interned with an Indian Investment Bank, PwC UK and will be interning further with the Financial Conduct Authority this summer. I would like to share my experience of applying to several organisations in the financial services area and getting through the application processes at PwC, Willis Towers Watson and the Financial Conduct Authority successfully. In my experience, most of these organisations have had a four-staged application process with an online application questionnaire, psychometric tests, telephone interview and assessment centre. In this article, I would like to focus on some of the most helpful resources I have used for my applications:

  • LUMS Careers Website: The careers website provides excellent resources to practice online psychometric tests of all types for free! Practice is the only trick to passing these tests. The quantitative reasoning tests I have given were never challenging in terms of mathematics techniques tested but mainly time pressured and logic driven.
  • Alumni: Many top employers will have university alumni working for them. I have found many of them keen to help and in an excellent position to guide me through every stage of the application. Many have even recently gone through the process themselves and are aware of the entire process and how to navigate through it. These people can be approached through LinkedIn or LUMS Careers.
  • Online Career Websites: Websites such as Glassdoors, WikiJobs and The Student Room can be invaluable resources to research application processes for most companies. These websites have students posting everything, from job reviews to help target and understand companies for applications to reviews about application process and frequently asked interview questions for telephone and video interviews.
  • Societies: LUIFS, Economics Society and several other management school societies organise events with firms ranging from HSBC, Deutsche Bank, PwC and EY to Accenture. These are fantastic opportunities to meet people from various  organisations in an informal environment and such meets are usually greatly appreciated when mentioned in application forms.
  • Financial Careers Coach: This special arrangement is available to LUMS students only. An experienced banker and careers coach holds mock assessment centres and other events throughout the year for students. Furthermore, his website, ‘Opening City Doors’ provides excellent application preparation advice, questions and even a regularly updated markets update for commercial awareness questions in interviews. The five-minute read can provide an excellent summary for any financial service interview and is easy to understand.
  • Society Experience: I cannot stress enough the importance of joining societies. My experience with LUIFS has helped me answer many difficult questions in interviews, has been looked upon favourably by employers and in masters applications and most importantly, has actually helped me grow tremendously, both professionally and personally.

Finally, I would strongly encourage any student targeting top financial services employers to start applying in September and October as most large employers start assessment centres by December. Furthermore, being an international student myself, I would strongly encourage others to apply to jobs and can say that plenty of opportunities are available as many top recruiters hire international students (usually clarified in the FAQ section of company careers website). Lastly, I would strongly advise a quality over quantity approach to applying. Having tried both for myself, I have found that speculative, unprepared applications seldom lead to success.

I wish you all the very best for your applications and am happy to be contacted regarding any questions regarding the organisations mentioned above.

 

Learning Opportunities at Lancaster University

Lancaster University Management School provides opportunities to learn outside of the conventional classroom based learning, creating a learning environment well suited to various styles of learner.

One such learning experience that I have taken part in during my second year of study is a management module, which involves working with a live client, to aid in resolving a real-world problem from the organisation.

The module is competitive from the beginning, with each group competing for their organisation of choice from a list of business (local and some further afield) who have partnered with the University to work with Management School students. This involves producing a ‘project bid’, in which the team must illustrate their understanding of their chosen client’s issues, as well as the team strengths to create an argument demonstrating why they should be allowed to work with the particular client. Once the bids have been evaluated, those who presented the strongest arguments are awarded the clients they requested to work with, and all other teams are allocated the remaining organisations.

Luckily for me, our project bid was strong enough to be awarded the client that we most wanted to work with. This was a small, local charity which meant our experience was very intensive and our involvement was perceived as being particularly important to the client.

Working with a charity was particularly rewarding, and a personal highlight was visiting the charity at the start of the module to learn more about the client. This was a great opportunity to speak to stakeholders and staff members to find out first hand important information about the problems faced. It was also great to be in a learning environment outside of University, in a real working environment and facing real organisational issues.

The project did not come without its challenges, though. An important part of the process for my group was to collect primary research, which involved approaching local people in the town centre. This proved to be more difficult than we had ever imagined, and encouraging people to speak to us wasn’t exactly easy!

The module runs over two terms, and is an intensive, hands on, real life experience. Working outside of the classroom acts as an opportunity to fully understand and experience the discrepancies between theory and practice, and understand the subject (in my case, management consultancy) in a much more in depth way compared to simply learning through lectures and seminars. Not only this, but this experience is a great CV booster – you can demonstrate real life skills working in a professional manner with genuine clients who have sought your help.

The assessment for this module involves an individual essay, which acts as an opportunity to reflect on the learning experience and how your understanding of the subject has changed with exposure to a real world consultancy issue. There is also a group report and presentation to the client, allowing you to showcase your hard work. The presentation is primarily for the client but moderated by the module tutors and lecturers, and therefore it really requires you to integrate your theoretical knowledge and practical experience in order to appeal to the different audiences.

I chose to study this module because I wanted to gain hands on experience whilst learning, and that is exactly what it provided. It truly is a one of a kind learning experience which inarguably throws you in at the deep end. Nevertheless, the experience is invaluable, providing real work experience and aiding in your academic study. It is an excellent opportunity to develop your interpersonal skills, and be able to show your understanding of a University subject in the real world.