Data Interview with David Ellis (Part 1)

This is part one (of two) of a Data Interview with Dr David Ellis (@davidaellis). David is a Lecturer in Computational Social Science and holds a 50th Anniversary Lectureship in Psychology at Lancaster University. David presented at the first Data Conversations on Data Visualization.

This is the first interview of hopefully a series to come about the impact of Open Data on research. The interview was conducted by Hardy Schwamm.

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Jisc Research Data Shared Services March 2017

Here at Lancaster University we are very excited to be part of a group of pilot institutions taking part in Jisc’s Research data shared services project.  This aims to provide a flexible range of services which suit the varied needs of institutions in the HE sector help achieve policy compliance for deposit, publication, discovery, storage and long term preservation of research data. It’s an ambitious project but one that there is an undoubted need for and we are trying to work with Jisc to help them achieve this goal.

Last week we were invited down to Jisc London HQ to learn about the progress of the project and – just as importantly – share our own thoughts and experiences on the process.

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Impressions from IDCC17 in Edinburgh (12th International Digital Curation Conference)

The below is a very quick summary of things that I found interesting, remarkable or funny at IDCC17. But before I start, a big thank you to Kevin Ashley and his team for organising such an interesting event with a varied programme! And thanks for all the conference pictures on Flickr!

Surgeons Hall Edinburgh, IDCC17 venue

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First Data Conversations 30 January 2017 – Summary of event & slides

The first Data Conversations happened on Monday, 31st of January 2017. Below is a quick overview of the action. You can find slides of four talks below.

Data Conversations Opening

Adrian Friday opening Data Conversations

The event was opened by Professor Adrian Friday from the Data Science Institute (DSI) who emphasised that the DSI is all about collaboration between disciplines which is also the spirit of Data Conversations. In fact the 25 attendees came from  a range of Departments: Biological and Life Sciences, Chemistry, Computing, Educational Research, History, Law, Lancaster Environment Centre, Politics, Psychology and others.

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First Data Conversations – Speakers confirmed!

Data Conversations on 30 January “Sharing Data – Benefits and Boundaries

We are very excited about the first Data Conversations event at Lancaster University coming up on 30 January 2017, 1.45-4pm. There will be 6 short talks from academics talking about aspects of their research data. We can now publish the agenda.

Detailed agenda

13:45 Registration and Coffee  
14:00 Welcome to Data Conversations Nigel Davies

(Data Science Institute)

14:10 – 14:50 First round of short talks
14:10 – 14:20 1. Does Linked Data have to be Open? Reflections from the Pelagios Commons Leif Isaksen

(History)

14:25 – 14:35 2. The Politics of Counting: Is Violent Crime Increasing or Decreasing? Jude Towers

(Sociology)

14:40 – 14:50 3. Protecting participants and their data on a sensitive topic Alison Scott-Baumann

(PPR)

14:55 – 15:10 Tea and coffee
15:10 – 15:55 Second round of short talks  
15:10 – 15:20 4. Building interactive data visualizations to support publications David Ellis

(Psychology)

15:15 – 15:30 5. Efficient sharing of numerical output Chris Jewell

(Medical School / CHICAS)

15:35 – 15:45 6. Mining and mapping places with multiple names’ Chris Donaldson & James Butler (History)
15:55 Close Hardy Schwamm (Library)

We are very happy that we get speaker from a range of disciplines! We are looking forward to the first Data Conversations and will report on how it went. Watch this space!

 

Researchers: what do they really think?

Image: Flickr https://flic.kr/p/8WpM2U – Rul Fernandes CC BY 2.0

Well… it’s probably quite hard to get to the truth of the matter but here at Lancaster we are trying to find out what researchers really think.  This is crucial for developing and improving our services and vital for delivering the service our researchers want.

We are one of the organisations taking part in the JISC RDM Shared Services pilot and you can read their take on the work being done here.  With JISC’s help we undertook a researcher survey to find out a bit more about the kinds of research data which were being produced, how the data were (or weren’t) being managed and researcher attitudes towards their data.

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Acting On Change: Pericles/DPC Conference and DPA Awards London 2016

DPA Awards 2016 nominees and judges (Image @SueCorrigall licence OGL)
DPA Awards 2016 nominees and judges (Image @SueCorrigall licence OGL)

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the Pericles/DPC Conference: Acting on Change at the Wellcome Institute in London.  The theme of the conference was moving forward with digital preservation; in other words taking steps beyond just the technical tools and looking outward instead of inward.  There were excellent keynotes and panel sessions and useful and thought-provoking workshops.  PERICLES (Promoting and Enhancing Reuse of Information through the Content Lifecycle) is a EU funded four year project which seeks to address the issues of managing digital preservation in an ever changing world.

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RDMF16 – Creating a Research Data Community

Are research institutions engaging their researchers with Research Data Management (RDM)? And if so, how are they doing it? In this post Hardy Schwamm (@hardyschwamm),  Research Data Manager, Lancaster University, and Rosie Higman (@RosieHLib), Research Data Advisor, University of Cambridge, and explore the work they are doing in their respective institutions.

Whilst funder policies were the initial catalyst for many RDM services at UK universities there are many reasons to engage with RDM, from increased impact to moving towards Open Research as the new normal. And a growing number of researchers are keen to get involved! These reasons also highlight the need for a democratic, researcher-led approach if the behavioural change necessary for RDM is to be achieved. Following initial discussions online and at the Research Data Network event in Cambridge on 6 September, we wanted to find out whether and how others are engaging researchers beyond iterating funder policies.

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