Spatial Humanities 2018: Keynote Speakers

David Bodenhamer is (founding) Executive Director of The Polis Center and Professor of History at IUPUI. An active researcher, Bodenhamer is author or editor of twelve books and has published over 30 journal articles and chapters in books. He has made over 75 presentations to audiences on four continents on topics ranging from legal and constitutional history to the use of GIS and advanced information technologies in academic and community-based research. Bodenhamer’s work in the new field of spatial humanities includes The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship (Indiana University Press, 2010), Deep Maps and Spatial Narratives (Indiana University Press, 2015), and Making Deep Maps: Foundations, Approaches, and Methods (forthcoming), in addition to a dozen published essays. The books were developed with Professors John Corrigan (Religious Studies) and Trevor Harris (Geography), his collaborators in the interdisciplinary Virtual Center for Spatial Humanities (VCSH), an institutional partnership among Florida State University, West Virginia University, and IUPUI. Bodenhamer serves as co-director of the VCSH, which he created with his Corrigan and Harris in 2008 to advance the field of spatial humanities. He also serves as co-general editor of the Indiana University Press Series on Spatial Humanities and co-editor of the IJHAC: A Journal of the Digital Humanities (formerly the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing, Edinburgh University Press). For more details, see:

Janelle Jenstad is Associate Professor of English at the University of Victoria; Executive Director and Coordinating Platform Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions; and Director of The Map of Early Modern London (MoEML). With Jennifer Roberts-Smith and Mark Kaethler, she co-edited Shakespeare’s Language in Digital Media (Routledge, 2018). She has edited John Stow’s A Survey of London (1598 text) for MoEML and is currently editing The Merchant of Venice for the ISE (with Stephen Wittek) and Heywood’s 2 If You Know Not Me You Know Nobody for DRE. Her articles have appeared in Digital Humanities QuarterlyElizabethan TheatreEarly Modern Literary Studies, Shakespeare BulletinRenaissance and Reformation, and The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies. She contributed chapters to Approaches to Teaching Othello (MLA); Teaching Early Modern Literature from the Archives (MLA); Institutional Culture in Early Modern England (Brill); Shakespeare, Language, and the Stage (Arden); Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate); New Directions in the Geohumanities (Routledge); Early Modern Studies and the Digital Turn (Iter); Placing Names: Enriching and Integrating Gazetteers (Indiana); Early Modern Studies and the Digital Turn (Iter); and Making Things and Drawing Boundaries (Minnesota). For more details, see: